Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Narragansett Bay Connects the Best of Rhode Island

Not quite a year ago, my wife and I decided to move from my native Ohio to Rhode Island; a state I, admittedly, knew very little about.

I knew from second grade geography that it’s the smallest state (and that Roger Williams ended up here…for some reason.) I thought a “quahog” was merely a town on Family Guy. I had heard something about “Waterfire” but - coming from a state where one of our largest rivers caught fire several times in the 60s - I could only assume that was a bad thing. I couldn't pronounce “Narragansett,” let alone spell it. But, I figured a place nicknamed “the Ocean State” must have something going for it.

Shortly after moving here, I set out to experience the best Rhode Island has to offer. I cruised around the state to check out the quintessential views of sailboats, fishing vessels, bridges and lighthouses. I spent long, relaxing afternoons on the beach in Narragansett.
I sampled local seafood at Iggy’s in Warwick; toured the mansions in Newport; rode along the East Bay bike path; and looked for seals from Rome Point.

            The best that Rhode Island has to offer – the beaches, the lighthouses, the seafood, the mansions, even Waterfire – all have one thing in common: the Bay. I've learned that Narragansett Bay is more than just a body of water; more than just a place for recreation; and more than just a source of great seafood. It defines the culture and character of Rhode Island (so much so that I often wonder if we should swap monikers with our ‘Bay State’ neighbors to the north.)

               As my wife and I put down roots in our new home state, we look forward to doing our part to “Save The Bay.” Other places we've lived have their own special places, but none that are as connected to and embraced by the people who live near it as Narragansett Bay. The Bay has been our single biggest source of enjoyment since moving here, and we look forward to getting to know it better in the years to come.

-Jed Thorp
Grant Writer, Save The Bay